Building pelvic floor muscle strength with kegel exercises for better sexual wellbeing.
About Kegel Exercises for Men and Women

Men dealing with premature ejaculation can greatly benefit from pelvic floor muscle strengthening through kegel exercises.

This article will explore the connection between kegel exercises and pelvic floor muscle strength and the consequent health benefits for men and women.

Let's get into it!

In this article:

What Are Kegel Exercises?

Kegel exercises are a method of contracting and relaxing the pelvic area to help strengthen the pelvic floor muscles.

Note: Kegel (pronounced kee-gull).

Also called pelvic floor exercises, Kegels exercises are beneficial for both men and women and can help with urinary incontinence and bowel control and affect sexual function.

What Are Kegel Exercises Good For?

The pelvic floor is a dome-shaped muscle that surrounds these structures.

Our pelvic region contains a urinary bladder, urethra, colon, rectum, and reproductive organs.

Kegel exercises benefits
Kegel exercises - strengthen the urinary sphincter and other muscles that control ejaculation. (Credit: SteadyFreddy®)

In women, this area also contains the uterus, ovaries and vagina.

The pelvic floor is a dome-shaped muscle that surrounds these structures. With proper strengthening, the pelvic muscles can support the integrity and function of our organs and, as a result, prevent problems that could arise due to weakness.

Kegel exercises benefit us by:

  • Reducing symptoms of bladder and bowel incontinence
  • Helping control the passing of wind Increase the strength and control of pelvic floor muscles Improved function of pelvic organs
  • Increase the strength and control of pelvic floor muscles
  • Improved function of pelvic organs

Benefits for Men

Kegel exercises offer a simple and effective remedy for men struggling with symptoms of premature ejaculation.

For men, Kegel exercises strengthen the pelvis muscles responsible for erections, ejaculation and emptying the urethra after urination.

The image below shows the location of muscles in the male pelvic floor area.

Male pelvic floor muscles strengthening with kegel exercises.
Male Pelvic Floor Muscles - 1. Body of Penis, 2. Bulbospongiosus Muscle, 3. Perineal Membrane, 4. Perineal Body, 5. External Anal Sphinster Muscle, 6. Rectal Canal, 7. Pubococcygeus Muscle, 8. Levator Ani Muscle, 9. Sacrum, 10. Iliac Crests Credit: SteadyFreddy®

The ischiocavernosus, bulbocavernosus and pubococcygeus muscles located between the anus and genitals help with each of these functions.

During arousal, these muscles will relax to allow blood to flow into the penis to help men achieve and maintain a strong erection.

The stronger these muscles are, the more likely they will delay ejaculation. Kegel exercises offer a simple and effective remedy for men struggling with symptoms of premature ejaculation.

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Benefits for Women

In addition, kegels prevent pelvic organ prolapse, common after pregnancy (especially with a cesarian section), menopause or a hysterectomy procedure.

Regarding pelvic floor muscle exercises, women can benefit just as much as men!

The process of contracting and relaxing the pelvic muscles helps to stimulate more blood circulation to the vagina, which helps to increase vaginal lubrication and boost levels of arousal. It can also make it easier for women to reach an orgasm during vaginal penetration.

Pelvic muscle contractions are an excellent exercise for women who are experiencing pain during sexual intercourse while inserting a tampon or during pelvic exams, as they help to promote greater control over the vaginal muscles.

The image below shows the location of muscles in the female pelvic floor area.

Female pelvic floor muscles strengthening with kegels
Female Pelvic Floor Muscles - 1. Public Crest, 2. Public Sumphysis, 3. Urethral Canal, 4. Bulb of Vestibule, 5. Vaginal Canal, 6. Posterior Fourchette, 7. Pubococcygeus, 8. Rectal Canal, 9. External Anal Sphinster Muscle, 10. Perineal Body, 11. Iliococcygeus, 12. Iliacus, 13. Levator Ani Muscle, 14. Sacrum, 15. Iliac Crests (Credit: SteadyFreddy®)

In addition, kegels prevent pelvic organ prolapse, common after pregnancy (especially with a cesarian section), menopause or a hysterectomy procedure.

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How to Do Kegel Exercises?

Kegel exercise does not require any equipment, so there is no excuse to incorporate these exercises into our daily routine.

To achieve the benefits pelvic floor muscle training offers, you must ensure you engage the correct muscles. That's why proper form is essential!

Here are 5 steps that both men and women can follow:

  • Begin either sitting down on a chair or lying down on your back with your knees bent
  • Contract your pelvic floor muscles by squeezing in like you're trying to stop yourself from urinating
  • Hold for 3 to 5 seconds, then relax for 3-5 seconds
  • Repeat the exercise for 10 repetitions, 3 times per day (morning, afternoon and evening)
  • Remember to breathe freely throughout this exercise and avoid stiffening other muscles

Once you find the right muscles and understand how a proper kegel is supposed to feel, you can comfortably do your pelvic floor exercises whenever and wherever.

Kegel exercise does not require any equipment, so there is no excuse to incorporate these exercises into our daily routine to improve our sexual wellbeing.

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How Long Does It Take for Kegel Exercises to Work

Like bicep curls will help tone and strengthen our bicep muscles, kegels can do the same for our pelvic floor muscles.

Like any other exercise, results take time. Suppose you're committed to your kegel exercise 3 times per day.

See the table below for a few timeframe examples for orientation purposes. Remember that everybody is different and so results may vary.

How often Timeframe Results
3 x per day 3-6 weeks change in bladder control
3 x per day 4-6 weeks increased vaginal tightness
3 x per day 12 weeks reduced symptoms of PE

Data Source: WedMD

Although starting young is beneficial, kegel exercises are especially beneficial when performed consistently throughout your lifetime. As seen in the chart below, aging affects the strength and function of our pelvic floor muscles. In other words, the older we get, our muscles become weaker!

Like bicep curls will help tone and strengthen our bicep muscles, kegels can do the same for our pelvic floor muscles. Remember, just because you can't see these muscles doesn't mean they wouldn't benefit from strengthening.

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When to See a Pelvic Floor Specialist

You may want to consider attending pelvic floor therapy if you continue experiencing symptoms of muscle imbalances or lack of pelvic floor control after 2-3 months of daily kegel exercising.

A pelvic floor therapist is a beneficial resource to help restore the strength and function of your pelvic floor muscles.

Suppose you're experiencing negative symptoms of a weak pelvic floor, such as urinary incontinence, premature ejaculation or pelvic organ prolapse. In that case, these specialists know how to guide movement and adjust for incorrect form.

Pelvic rehab physical therapist Elizabeth Hopkins mentions, "we look for three things for optimal pelvic floor function: strength, flexibility and coordination".

You may want to consider attending pelvic floor therapy if you continue experiencing symptoms of muscle imbalances or lack of pelvic floor control after 2-3 months of daily kegel exercising.

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Pelvic Floor and Kegel Devices

After inserting the cone, the goal is to contract the pelvis muscles to prevent the device from slipping out.

Numerous kegel, urethral and pelvic devices have become popular as an alternative methods for improving the pelvis region's strength, flexibility and functionality.

The weighted vaginal cone is a device women use to train their pelvic floor muscles. After inserting the cone, the goal is to contract the pelvis muscles to prevent the device from slipping out.

Similarly, there is also a kegel cone that adds more resistance as you perform your exercises.

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Frequently Asked Questions

What are Kegel exercises good for?

Kegel exercises help to strengthen your pelvic floor muscles to support and address weaknesses in the bladder, small intestine, vagina, uterus and rectum. While they are beneficial for preventing urine leakage, Kegel exercises help boost arousal, increase lubrication (for women) and reduce symptoms of premature ejaculation (for men).

Do Kegel exercises make you tighter?

Yes! When performed correctly and consistently, Kegel exercises effectively tone and tighten the muscles in the vagina. This can even lead to more intense orgasms for most women.

How do I know if I'm doing Kegels right?

Women can insert one finger into their vagina and perform a kegel. When done correctly, you'll feel a tight grip around the finger during contraction, then a release during relaxation.

Men can check if their kegel form is correct while urinating by stopping their urine flow. When done correctly using the right muscles, you'll feel a muscle contraction near the back of the pelvis floor.

Do you squeeze the butt when doing Kegels?

No. During a kegel exercise, you should relax your buttock muscles with contraction since it has no connection to the pelvic floor.

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KEY TAKEAWAYS

  • Kegel exercises are a simple and effective way to gain strength in the pelvic floor 
  • Kegels are equally beneficial for both men and women by improving bladder control, minimizing symptoms of fecal incontinence and improving sexual function
  • Kegels are an effective treatment for premature ejaculation in men and pelvic organ prolapse in women
  • Pelvic exercises are recommended up to 3 times per day and held for 3-5 seconds each time
  • If pelvic dysfunction continues to persist, consider speaking with a pelvic floor specialist for treatment options
  • For advanced kegel training, consider using the vaginal cone or the kegel cone to increase the resistance gradually

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Medical Disclaimer: This article is for informational purposes only and is not intended to give medical advice or substitute for the medical advice of a physician.

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